Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Hello Dear Classmates.-

Here there are more information about ENGLISH TENSES IN PERFECT.

PRESENT PERFECT, PAST PERFECT AND FUTURE PERFECT: http://englishstandarts.blogspot.com/2012/01/perfect-tenses.html#3

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS, PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS AND FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS: http://englishstandarts.blogspot.com/2012/02/perfect-continuous-tenses.html#1

THE PERFECT TENSES
The perfect tenses: grammar rules, examples and when to use

THE PRESENT PERFECT
RULE: The present tense of the verb to have + the past participle of the main verb

AFF:  Mr. Smith has finished his work. He can rest now.
NEG: Sammuel has not been to London this month.
INT:  Has Sarah studied abroad since she graduated from college?

ATTENTION:

ü The time of the action is indefinite when the action is closely connected with the present.
E.g. : Silvia has eaten much. She is sick now.

ü In this sentences not have to use specific date o time.
E. g. : You finished your homework at 8 o’clock. ->Simple past

ü The action or state that started in the past and continues into the present.
E. g.: He has worked since Christmas.

ü The action performed within a period of time which has not yet ended. The period may be indicated by such words: this year, never, yet, etc.
E. g.: He has never failed in his exams.

THE PAST PERFECT

RULE: The past tense of the verb to have + the past participle of the main verb

AFF:  Mr. Smith told us that he had finished his work.
NEG: Sammuel had not been to London before the winter.
INT:  Had Sarah studied abroad when she graduated from college?
ATTENTION.-
ü Describe an action completed before a certain moment in the past and these sentences are used to make sequences of events clear.
E.g. : When she had given her speech, she stood up.

THE FUTURE PERFECT

RULE: The future tense of the verb to have + the past participle of the main verb

AFF:  Mr. Smith will have finished his work, he can rest at afternoon.
NEG: Sammuel will have not been to London this month.
INT:  Will Sarah have studied abroad since she graduated from college?

ATTENTION.-

ü The future perfect to use for say that something will be finished by a particular time in the future.

E. g.: In 4 years time I’ll have finished the classes and I’ll be able to earn some money at last.

ü The future perfect structure sometimes use with ‘by’ or ‘in’

E. g.: I think astronauts will have landed on Mercury by the year 2020.

I’ll not have finished in an hour so you couldn´t use the computer.




THE PERFECT CONTINUOUS SENTENCES

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

RULE: The present perfect tense of the verb to be + the present participle of the main verb

AFF:  You have been waiting here for two hours.
NEG:  You have not been waiting here for two hours.
INT:  Have you been waiting here for two hours?

ATTENTION.-

ü The action which began in the past, has been going on up to the present and may be still going on.

ü The present perfect denotes a complete action while with the Present Perfect Continuous there is no implication of completeness.

Examples: 
I have been living here for three years.

The members of Parachute (rock band from Charlottesville, Virginia) graduated from college in May 2008 and since then have been touring and promoting their debut album Losing Sleep and sophomore album The Way It Was full-time.

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

RULE: The past perfect tense of the verb to be  + the present participle of the main verb

AFF:  She told me that you had been waiting here for two hours.
NEG:  She told me that you had not been waiting here for two hours.
INT:  We arrived a few minutes ago, had you been waiting here for two hours?

ATTENTION.-

ü  The Past Perfect Continuous expresses an action which began before a given past moment and continued into it or up to it.

ü  The action which was in progress just before a given past moment and its effect tells on the past situation in some way.

E.g.: They said that they had been working in this laboratory since they graduated from the University.


FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

RULE: The future  perfect tense of the verb to be  + the present participle of the main verb

AFF:  She told me that you will have been waiting here for two hours.
NEG:  She tells me that you will not have been waiting here for two hours.
INT:  We arrived a few minutes ago, will you have been waiting here for two hours?

ATTENTION.-
ü  This construction is used for an event that will still be in progress at a certain point in the future. 

Example: 
June 1st, he
 will have been working here for 10 years.
He
 will have been working in the garden for an hour before you come to help him. 

Resources:

1 comment:

  1. hmmmmmmmmm such a nice blog . The perfect tenses: grammar rules, examples and when to use ,Such a nice way to explain every thing i also run a blog on same topic plz vist also
    http://activeandpassivevoic3.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete

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